Tuesday, 27 March 2018

More birds from my travels seen in South Africa and Botswana.

Little stint (Calidris minuta). Botswana.
See comments for possible identification of this being Kittlitz’s plover (Charadrius pecuarius).

Broad-tailed paradise whydah (Vidua obtusa). Botswana

Shaft-tailed whydah or queen whydah (Vidua regia). Botswana.


Southern yellow-billed hornbill (Tockus leucomelas). Botswana and South Africa.

As above.

As above.

Southern red-billed hornbill (Tockus rufirostris). Botswana.

As above.  During the incubation (brooding of the eggs), the nest entrance is typically blocked off with a plaster of mud, droppings and fruit pulp. The purpose for this is to keep the nest, including the brooding female, eggs and young chicks protected from predators. A narrow opening is left to allow the male to transfer food to the mother and the chicks.

Swainson's spurfowl, Swainson's francolin or chikwari (Pternistis swainsonii). Botswana and South Africa.

African jacana (Actophilornis africanus). Botswana.

The African darter (Anhinga rufa), sometimes called the snakebird. Chobe, Botswana.

As above.

Pied kingfisher (Ceryle rudis). Chobe, Botswana.

  A pair- as above,

Speckled pigeon (Columba guinea), or (African) rock pigeon. Elephant Sands, Botswana.

As above,

Brown-hooded kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris). South Coast, South Africa.

Trumpeter hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator). Kwa-ZuluNatal, South Africa.

Linking with Wild Bird Wednesday 296


To be continued.....

25 comments:

  1. What a feast for the eyes, especially the hornbill!

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    1. Thanks Marie, I felt so much at home seeing all the birds that I grew up with, but I never had a camera that was good enough then to take photos of then. I really want to go back and see more :-) Take care Diane

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  2. A great collection of bird photos.

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    1. Thanks glad that you have enjoyed them. Happy Easter and take care t'other Diane

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  3. When I visited Afica, (Gambia, Kenya, North Africa) I too didn't have a digital camera. You have some fine photos there, especially the hornbills.

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    1. Thanks so much Phil for the visit and the kind comment. I feel so sad now that I lived there for 50 years and only ever had a Brownie Box camera!!! Visiting last year with my Nikon and telescopic lens was a complete eye opener. Hope that you have a good Easter Diane

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    2. Hello Diane. I'm sure you are correct but do you have another picture of that stint? It is at a rather strange angle and looks a little plain on the back for Little Stint. I only see them in autumn when they are very well marked, juveniles and adults.

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    3. Hi Phil, It is the only photo I managed to get of it, and it is not my identification. I sent the photo to a friend in RSA. This was taken in February 2017. I have just looked in 'Roberts Birds of Southern Africa'and although I agree, the markings on my photo are not as marked as the ones in the photos in the book, I also cannot see any other bird similar that it could have been in Botswana. I am no expert, and I ask when in doubt. Thanks for the query though and I appreciate your interest. If you have any other ideas I am welcome to suggestions. Diane

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    4. Diane. I think it is Kittlitz's Plover. Probably a dull and not well marked female.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kittlitz%27s_plover

      https://www.hbw.com/ibc/species/kittlitzs-plover-charadrius-pecuarius

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  4. Absolutely amazing! Love all the color!

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    1. Thanks so much Betty for the visit and the comment. The South African birds are pretty colourful, or I think so. Happy Easter Diane

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  5. Wonderful exotic birds! So different from what we normally see!

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    1. Many thanks for the visit and the comment much appreciated. Hope you have a good Easter Diane

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  6. Great serie of birds! Beautiful photos.

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    1. Thanks Anu for the visit and the comment, much appreciated. Happy Easter Diane

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  7. Wow! You commented on my blog Garden Grumbles and Cross Stitch Fumbles, so I looked up your profile and found this blog - amazing! I am going to become a Follower for sure!

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    1. Thanks Beth both for the visit and the comment and following. Have a good Easter Diane

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  8. Hello!:) Captivating images of all these exotic looking birds.:)

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    1. Thanks you for looking in to this post as well and for the kind comment. Happy weekend Diane

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  9. wow, so many gorgeous birds. I envy you. :) But lad you shared them.

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    1. Thanks NatureFootsteps for the visit and the comment. It is a pleasure to share them. I now want to return to get more photos!! Have a good day Diane

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  10. What a wonderful set of pictures - every single one would be new for me if I saw them in the feather. I hope you have lots more to come!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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    1. Thanks Stewart, I have quite a few from Africa but I also have quite a lot from Europe as well. Cheers Diane

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  11. This second set of images is absolutely astounding Diane. I love them all, but the Hornbill set is the tops in my opinion. I now look forward to moving onto your third post on this blog, which I am about to do right now!

    Have a great weekend - - - Richard

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    1. Thank you Richard, that one shot of the yellow-billed hornbill head was really a lucky shot. Not often I can get a bird's eye as clear as that. Thanks for taking the time to comment. Take care Diane

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Thanks so much for commenting, it is appreciated and it is my policy to try to answer every one even if only to say thank you.